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Rumor Mongering: Walcott to Liverpool; and We Have a Bingo

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Fear not, Reds, if you were worried that the Transfer Committee (TM) was not considering perennial target Theo Walcott, Liverpool are putting together a £120,000 per week wage packet for the Arsenal striker.

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Liverpool apparently are preparing a 25 million pound bid for Arsenal's inconsistent, pacey front man. What give all that is tragic, whatever its form, the characteristic of the sublime, is the first inkling of the knowledge that the world and life can give no satisfaction, and are not worth our investment in them. The tragic spirit consists in this. Accordingly it leads to resignation. Schopenhauer, Arthur, The World As Will and Representation, V. 1.

Rumors of this purchase are unsourced. And to this world, to this scene of tormented and agonised beings, who only continue to exist by devouring each other, in which, therefore, every ravenous beast is the living grave of thousands of others, and its self-maintenance is a chain of painful deaths; and in which the capacity for feeling pain increases with knowledge, and therefore reaches its highest degree in man, a degree which is the higher the more intelligent the man is; to this world it has been sought to apply the system of optimism, and demonstrate to us that it is the best of all possible worlds. The absurdity is glaring. Schopenhauer, Arthur, The World As Will and Representation, V. 1.

The rumored purchase is direct, of relatively fast mind, and capable of intricate interplay, as well as feasting upon over-the-top and threaded through balls, which Liverpool's more creative attacking midfielders are more than capable of supplying. Any beautiful mind, full of ideas, would always express itself in the most natural, simple and straightforward way, anxious to communicate its thoughts to others (if this is at all possible) and thus relieve the solitude that he must experience in a world such as this: but conversely, intellectual poverty, confusion and wrong-headedness, clothe themselves in the most laboured expressions and obscure turns of phrase in order to conceal petty, trivial, bland or trite thoughts in difficult and pompous expression. Schopenhauer, Arthur, The World As Will and Representation, V. 1.

The player certainly has shown a willingness to press for Wenger, and that might bode well for his ability to fit into Klopp's counter press. But he will fear least to become nothing in death who has recognized that he is already nothing now, and who consequently no longer takes any share in his individual phenomenon, because in him knowledge has, as it were, burnt up and consumed the will, so that no will, thus no desire for individual existence, remains in him any more. Schopenhauer, Arthur, The World As Will and Representation, V. 1.

All things considered, 25 million would be better spent elsewhere on a less hackneyed footballer. [Materialism] seeks the primary and most simple state of matter, and then tries to develop all the others from it; ascending from mere mechanism, to chemism, to polarity, to the vegetable and to the animal kingdom. And if we suppose this to have been done, the last link in the chain would be animal sensibility - that is knowledge - which would consequently now appear as a mere modification or state of matter produced by causality. Now if we had followed materialism thus far with clear ideas, when we reached its highest point we would suddenly be seized with a fit of the inextinguishable laughter of the Olympians. As if waking from a dream, we would all at once become aware that its final result - knowledge, which it reached so laboriously, was presupposed as the indispensable condition of its very starting-point, mere matter; and when we imagined that we thought matter, we really thought only the subject that perceives matter; the eye that sees it, the hand that feels it, the understanding that knows it. Thus the tremendous petitio principii reveals itself unexpectedly. Schopenhauer, Arthur, The World As Will and Representation, V. 1.