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Brendan Rodgers Favoured to Become Next Manchester United Manager

The former Liverpool manager is increasingly being talked about as the favourite to replace Ole Gunnar Solskjær.

Leeds United v Leicester City - Premier League Photo by Robbie Jay Barratt - AMA/Getty Images

With Antonio Conte off the market, Mauricio Pochettino still not on it, and Ole Gunnar Solskjær doing no better than treading water and barely avoiding the sack as manager of Manchester United there seems a need to identify a potential mid-season replacement.

Or at least there does in the land of punditry and rumour, as in recent days former Liverpool manager and current Leicester City boss Brendan Rodgers has begun to be talked about as the favoured choice to take over at United for the consistently uninspiring Solskjær.

Looking to fill space during the international break, The Manchester Evening News and The Star have both today anointed Rodgers the answer for United. Going further, they talk about a clause in his contract that would allow him to leave for a Champions League side.

Sources within the club are said to be confident that Rodgers will soon replace Solskjær, despite that Rodgers once managed Liverpool—and at the time said he’d never be able to take on the United job—and is in the midst of a rather difficult spell at Leicester City.

Just how close Solskjær might actually be to the sack is a difficult question to answer, and one would have thought if United really did have a first choice replacement lined up who was willing and available he’d have been gone at the start of the international break.

It’s also far from clear whether United fans would be willing to embrace a man who once managed their historic rivals—and who was unable to deliver the kind of significant successes that club’s fanbase craved and that his replacement Jürgen Klopp now has.

Still, at least that Liverpool connection might make it easier for United to move on from Rodgers should they decide to replace Solskjær with him—and then find he isn’t actually able to take them all that much further than Solskjær has in three seasons in charge.