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Divock Origi, The Philosopher, Brings His Game To The Club World Cup

The Liverpool legend waxes lyrical about leaving the storytelling to others and playing his game.

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Liverpool FC v Watford FC - Premier League Photo by Andrew Powell/Liverpool FC via Getty Images

Divock Origi is really the gift that keeps on giving. The Belgian striker isn’t the first name on the team sheet, which is understandable in this squad of objectively world-class talents, some of who are the best in the world in their positions, but he arguably did more than any other player to shape the course of the season last year, especially in the biggest moments.

In preparation for the Club World Cup, and a chance to be crowned “World Champions” for the first time in the club’s otherwise rich history, Origi took a few moments to talk about what he and the rest of the squad need to do to bring home the big prize.

“It’s just about us playing our football and taking our values from Liverpool and bringing them here to this tournament and doing the same thing,” Divock told the club’s official website, “That’s when we are at our best.

“I think for me I just see it as a chance, another tournament where I can enjoy my game.

“I know whenever I play my game all the results will follow. So I don’t focus on the outcome, I’m really on what I put in and that’s what I’m going to try to do – just give the best of myself. Then hopefully it can be as positive.”

This is mostly standard issue, player and manager cliche talking point stuff. However, when asked if he was planning on another big Divock Origi special moment on the world stage, he gave us the interview equivalent of, “Corner taken quickly...”

“I leave that to the people. The storytelling, that’s more something for people. But for me it’s just about performing and that’s how I keep my focus.”

James Milner has spoken about Origi’s almost impossibly chilled personality, and his stunning ability to “live in the now,” forgotten headphones in hotel rooms and all. This quote speaks to that personality, and his own philosophy of “perform, and let others write the stories.”

In a way he’s right. He performs—against Everton, Barcelona, Tottenham, etc—and we proclaim his legendary status. But in a way he’s wrong. His performances, especially in the semifinal of the Champions League, were not written by us. They couldn’t have been, no one would have believed it.

He might not be the first name on the team sheet. But will he give us a memorable moment tonight and/or Saturday in the final? I wouldn’t bet against it.