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Liverpool’s Iron Lady, Anne Williams, Receives A Proper Mural On Anfield Road

Anne Williams was instrumental in the fight for justice for the Hillsborough victims, after losing her 15 year old son Kevin.

Hillsborough ‘Accidental Death’ Inquest Verdicts Quashed At High Court Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

The buildings around Anfield been discovered to be great canvases for murals.

Trent Alexander-Arnold has one, Jordan Henderson has one, and now finally a fitting tribute to one of the strongest advocates for the Hillsborough victims - Anne Williams - has her own spot of honor on Anfield Road.

Williams lost her 15 year old son Kevin in the disaster on April 15th, 1989, and it was her work with the other families that encouraged courts to overturn the “accidental death” verdicts and launch a new inquest into the true cause of death of the football fans at Hillsborough Stadium.

Williams passed away in April 2013 from cancer, just 8 months after the publication of the Hillsborough Independent Panel brought all the facts of the disaster to light and truly pushed the fight forward.

The mural was commissioned from Scouse artist Paul Curtis by family friend Rupen Ganatra to coincide with fans’ return to Anfield, and the little thing of a drama about her life upcoming this fall from network ITV.

“This mural means the world to me and the kids and all of our family. It’s been great seeing all the different ones going up around Anfield so to have one in memory of my mum is amazing and very emotional for us but in a lovely way,” Williams’ daughter, Sarah, told The Echo.

“I can’t thank Rupen, who has always been such a wonderful friend to us and my mum over the years, and Paul, who has done such a fantastic job, enough. We just feel so proud.”

Ganatra commissioned the mural on a property he owns near the Arkles Pub on Anfield Road, and hopes the tribute will be a reminder to future generations of Williams’ legacy.

“It was always very clear to us how instrumental Anne was in uncovering the truth over Hillsborough and we feel very lucky to have met and got to know her,” Ganatra said.

“She was absolutely fearless in taking on the establishment on her own, whether through the UK or European courts, and was a totally inspirational figure to me and many other people in this city and beyond.

“Despite the terrible way she was treated over many years, she never ever gave up and always believed the truth would eventually see the light of day if we all kept going and she was proven completely right.

“This is why we felt a memorial tribute of some sort is the least we could do to remind the City of who she was and what she did and why her legacy is so important for future generations.”

William’s fight for justice deserved a proper memorial, and one couldn’t be more fitting than the mural on Anfield Road — near the club her son loved.