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Hendo Heartache Over Plantar Fasciitis

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Now that Jordan Henderson is back Honey Badgering on the pitch, the captain opened up about his bout with plantar fasciitis, and what it could mean going forward.

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Though not uncommon in professional athletes, plantar fasciitis is still a tricky diagnosis to work around. The pain can come about suddenly, take weeks or months to subside, and it is incurable. Unfortunately, it is precisely what Jordan Henderson has been working through, dating back to April, according to a recent interview.

"It was unbearable every time I planted my foot it was like a burning, stabbing, nerve pain. Even lying in bed there was pain in my foot. It is much better now but there is always that question is it going to come back?"

For someone whose whole career centers around what he can do with his feet, the diagnosis has to be equal parts horrifying and frustrating. He sought advice from all over the world, everyone from medical experts, to the Internet, to former Liverpool defender Jamie Carragher.

"I worried about it quite a lot. I'd go online trying to find different things that maybe someone hadn't seen. It's not that rare, a lot of people do get it. It's just a matter of time before it gets back to normal. I spoke to Carra briefly and we also spoke to quite a few experts and doctors all over the world to try and nip it in the bud." Henderson continued (and those among us who are squeamish might not want to finish reading this quote), "A lot of people say keep doing cortisone injections and eventually it will probably just rupture. That might be the relief that is needed.

In the meantime, Henderson is still working his way back to full Honey Badger mode and is likely to feature in tomorrow's clash with Newcastle. As for the root cause of the condition, it is believed that a change in boots might be the primary culprit.

"I don't think it has anything to do with my gait, it might have, but I very much doubt it," Henderson added.