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Uruguayan FA Comes to Defense of Luis Suarez

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As they did last year when the forward was embroiled in the racial abuse saga with Patrice Evra, the Uruguayan FA advocates for Luis Suarez, this time condemning comments made by British representative Jim Boyce.

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It's hard to tell what type of support for Luis Suarez exists in the footballing world outside of England, because holy shit there's football outside of England?

But on two occasions in the past year--and yes, it's depressing that there have been two occasions, regardless of blame and truth and etc.--the home footballing association of Suarez has leapt to the player's defense, first during the Patrice Evra case and now as he's become public enemy number one in the race to gain the highest moral ground possible at his expense by talking about how awful falling down is unless it's clever or English or something.

Anyhow, the Uruguayan FA have taken the bold step of forwarding a letter to Sepp Blatter outlining their grievances with the comments made by Jim Boyce, who earlier in the week picked out Suarez as he discussed the "cancer" that diving has become. I'm not familiar with the protocol of FIFA executives, but as far as good taste goes, particularly on a weekend that saw one of Great Britain's own commit an even more egregious flop, Boyce's comments were questionable at best.

Questionable proved to be enough for the FA of a nation that is fiercely loyal to their players and their football, and a letter co-signed by Association President Sebastián Bauzá and General Secretary Aníbal de Olivera outlined their displeasure in no uncertain terms (link is to the download for a PDF in Spanish, I used FreeTranslation after copy/pasting since I stopped knowing Spanish too long ago).

Whereas Liverpool's support of Luis Suarez has been fumbled and forced at all the wrong times, the Uruguayan FA has never made a secret of where their sentiment lies, and they've managed to do so without coming across as ignorant or bigoted. They feel that their man has been and continues to be wronged by the histrionic and self-righteous footballing culture in which his club career takes place, and they've proven to be advocates without coming across as apologists.